Japanese garden

Japanese people like sobriety and simplicity. These two values ​​are reflected in the composition of Zen gardens. For example, we must not multiply artifices like lanterns, bridges, water cascades: not enough too much. But privilege a single decorative element. Japanese gardens are all simply extremely well maintained and have rules to adhere to when planning. For example, in Japanese art, odd numbers are considered auspicious, bringing positive. This rule is expressed in the following manner in Zen gardens: no plants planted by two or even four, but in odd numbers only; figures 3, 5 and 7 are particularly appreciated. Same remark for the rocks: their number must be odd. The Japanese garden also likes asymmetry, because in Japan harmony born of imbalance.
Water is present in all Japanese gardens from the largest to the pocket garden and in all its forms, streams, waterfalls, ponds, pools, springs and of course, water stones. Inside bonsai are also typical of Japanese culture. Experts in plant size, gardeners are able to form these trees to keep them small, it’s a real art.

Below are the symbols in the garden

Water

Water has a place of choice among the elements of a Japanese garden.
It contributes to the expression of nature and symbolizes renewal, calm, wonder and continuity in the afterlife. In a Sansui Japanese garden, that is to say containing elevations, various degrees are provided for the water to circulate.
Water comes in many forms. It accumulates in ponds, flows in streams or tumbles in waterfalls.
Clear, circulating water helps keep the air fresh throughout the summer.
Ponds and waterfalls receive a precise orientation to the sun to determine how it will be reflected by the water.

Rocks

The stones receive special attention in Eastern philosophy.
Symbol of the duration and omnipresence of the forces of nature, they anchor the garden to the ground and give it a specific personality.
The stones are arranged according to strict rules, according to their shapes and sizes; they are often paired in pairs and by contrast of style (a male rock opposed to a female rock).
The stones create a relief, produce hills and valleys giving rise to waterfalls, streams and ponds.
The type of stone to use is one of the most important elements in the design of a Japanese garden.

Lantern
With the advent of the tea ceremony, the lantern has become an important element in the layout of a Japanese garden.Originally intended to guide visitors during nocturnal celebrations, its light was also seen as the light of knowledge dispelling clouds of ignorance. Carved in stone, the Yukimi-gata lantern, or lantern of snow, which we can admire here is in common use. Placed near the water, it provides an architectural element that contrasts with the natural components of the garden.

Bridges
The bridges are privileged sites in a Japanese garden, where one will linger and admire the beauty of the landscape, watch the carps swim in their waters and enjoy the sweetness of the breeze.
Bridges can be built of wood, bamboo, earth or stone. Whether rounded, arched or zigzagged, they are always in harmony with the surrounding nature.

Plants
The Japanese show a natural ability to interpret the charm of plants and flowers to express their joys and sorrows. Their communion with nature is manifested through elaborate symbolism and that is why their interest in the plant world has become a real passion. Plants are associated with moving thoughts and universal forms of life.
The care given to plants in a Japanese garden is similar to that given to bonsai: living plants are shaped to the exact shape necessary for the symbolic or graphic effect desired.

 

You will find public gardens and gardens of temples of supermarkets during your visits. However, when you walk in the streets and look at the gardens of the population, you will see gardens of small sizes extremely well laid out, with a lot of plant-cut plants like ilex crenata carved on several floors.

Dwarf conifers also hold an important place as they are interesting in small spaces and can also be pruned in different ways.

It is also in Japan that you can cross bamboo forests, observing subjects almost 20 meters high. Bamboo is also used in various garden decoration, such as to decorate a fountain, create a pergola, or even made decorative objects.

You will see Japanese maple subjects spanning several meters, because extremely ancient, and of course the famous Japanese cherry, which are one of the attractions of the country in the spring, when the gardens and courtyards are fully flowered with their beautiful flowers .

You will find public gardens and gardens of temples of supermarkets during your visits. However, when you walk in the streets and look at the gardens of the population, you will see gardens of small sizes extremely well laid out, with a lot of plant-cut plants like ilex crenata carved on several floors.

Dwarf conifers also hold an important place as they are interesting in small spaces and can also be pruned in different ways.

It is also in Japan that you can cross bamboo forests, observing subjects almost 20 meters high. Bamboo is also used in various garden decoration, such as to decorate a fountain, create a pergola, or even made decorative objects.

You will see Japanese maple subjects spanning several meters, because extremely ancient, and of course the famous Japanese cherry, which are one of the attractions of the country in the spring, when the gardens and courtyards are fully flowered with their beautiful flowers .

The species can also vary according to the localization in the country, to the south one will have much more essence of tree like palm trees and other tropical plants mingling with the basic essences. In the north of the country, in the region of Hokkaido, cold-resistant plants will be found during the winter.

For the choice of plants, below is a list of plants that you will find frequently, in Latin name. You will see that many end up ‘japonica’, which means that these plants are native to the country.

– Azalea japonica
– Camellia japonica
– Acer palmatum
– Rhododendron
– Aucuba japonica
– Hydrangea macrophylla
– Hydrangea paniculata
– Pieris japonica
– Nandina domestica
– Phyllostachys
– Prunus incisa
– Prunus serrulata
– Ilex crenata
– Cornus controversa
– Kerria japonica
– Fargesia rufa
– Euonymus japonicus
– Ginkgo biloba
– Magnolia stellata
– Taxus baccata


What is also special in Japan is to see and observe the gardeners still maintain. Similarly, like the rest, they are extremely caring about plants and each size is done in a meticulous and conscientious way. For example they cut the flowers of the shrubs with a small special chisel, and each flowers one by one. Here, very little motorized equipment, except if we have no choice. Even for pruning you will see them favored small tools like hand saws rather than chainsaws. The plant has a soul and it is important to respect it.
In adequacy with a prosperous work, here it is not the productivity and the speed that prevails, but the know how and the time spent to maintain and cut each tree in the best ways. For the size of a classic flowering shrub, where the others take the size hedge where the shears, here will be useful the chisel for the flowers and only the pruner. He is sure that in Japan, a gardener need to have great skills.

 

 

 

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